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February 24, 2022

Comments

Worth noting that these patents were all challenged in parallel IPRs. The PTAB held that Teva had not proven unpatentability of any of these same challenged claims, even as the District Court (under a higher standard of proof) held them all obvious. Go figure...

Well the majority said it was a close case and, frankly, shouldn't we expect the PTAB to "get it right" more often in close cases than the Court (no matter how often those expectations might have been shattered)? But it is paradoxical in view of the burden of proof. On the other hand this is a little like the Monty Hall problem: the Federal Circuit knew that the district court had done and could defer on the factual grounds of their obviousness decision.

Thanks for the comment.

Interesting case. Just going by this summary, even though I'm not usually inclined to agree with Judge Newman, it seems like she has a point here. Long-felt need for a better product is quite a different animal from a motivation to combine the specific elements present in the prior art to arrive at the claimed invention. Maybe I'm missing something that's only apparent from reading the underlying opinion.

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