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« Developing IP Strategies for Crystalline Forms Conference | Main | Conference & CLE Calendar »

September 06, 2009

Comments

There is a corollary to this line of reasoning directly relevant to IP. The heavy emphasis on coding regions and "genes" of somewhat known function presumes a conception of organisms as collections of cells and cells as bags of genes that make proteins that are also in the bag. The job of patents has been to specify which parts in that (generic) bag belong to whom. Several problems: 1. some DNA encodes multiple products; 2. some really interesting phenomena are about timing and control rather than DNA sequence specifying amino acid sequence.

Dear BCD:

Not sure they are problems, in this respect. If you want to make sufficient quantities of a protein (whether it is a hormone, an enzyme, or an antibody), you can treat cells as little manufacturing plants for your protein, and the validity (or limitations) of the reductionist paradigm are not particularly relevant.

However, you are correct that biological organisms are more complex that that. This may be the reason that antisense technology and gene therapy have failed or taken longer to work than expected.

Thanks for the comment.

Well sir, 09/12/09

My name is
Todd J.Tocco
2014 Fiero Avenue
Rotterdam, N.Y.

And I'm one of the top 100 inventors. I'm not a molecular biology, cellular biology, and genetics,or biotech industry.
I believe that G.H.I. Which is precent and lies dormant in everyones bodys. Is the reason people get alheizmers.
And should be ruled out first.

Thank you

27/08/2010

my name is
drishya pillai
kcc nagar
jaipur(india)

sir,
i'm a student interested in biotechnology and related domains,though we have just been introduced to the topic.
i'm eagerly looking forward to prepare a project on the same(biotechnology-the green gold of the new era)and i would surely be obliged if i got your views and ideas on the topic as well.
thank you

The comments to this entry are closed.

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