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« Court Report | Main | USPTO Expands and Extends Patent Prosecution Highway Programs »

September 16, 2013

Comments

This use sounds the same as in a 19th century Supreme Court case--Egbert v. Lipman (phonetic)--where the inventor let his girlfriend try out some corset stays for a while (without restrictions). The Court held that was putting the invention into public use. Sounds like the same kind of release into the public domain. So this decision is nothing surprising.

Agreed, Richard. But we try to write about all the biotech cases at the Federal Circuit, not just the controversial ones.

Thanks for the comment.

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