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« Few "Reform" Provisions Remain in S. 23 Relating to the Judiciary | Main | "Reform" at the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office »

March 21, 2011

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Comments

A couple of years ago, some academicians suggested that the reason RNAi technology had not reached the commercial impact that it could because of a patent thicket. That theory fell with a resounding thud.

""As you can see from the amicus briefs, and from a letter previously sent to the Attorney General by over 260 signatories, this is an absolutely pivotal case that threatens the ability of inventors and innovative organizations to survive," "

Finally. I tried to tell them way back when that it just wasn't all that exciting, but they were all "omg omg it's the best thing evar". I was like "whatev".

"Also, despite no clear proof that a drug using RNAi can effectively treat a human disease, about a dozen RNAi drugs in clinical trials are currently pending, which is more than ever before."

Amazing what with all the hype about the death of bio being mere minutes away thanks to their patents expiring.

Dear 6:

To be clear, it is traditional (small molecule) pharma that faces a "patent cliff," not biotech. In fact, biotech is believed to be the salvation of such companies (which have vast experience in getting drugs to market).

Another reason why biotech needs enforceable patents.

"To be clear, it is traditional (small molecule) pharma that faces a "patent cliff," not biotech. In fact, biotech is believed to be the salvation of such companies (which have vast experience in getting drugs to market)."

O well I'll be.

"Another reason why biotech needs enforceable patents. "

Well I think that might be going a bit far.

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