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« USPTO Recognizes 30th Anniversary of Bayh-Dole Act | Main | Symposium on Role of Intellectual Property in Development »

December 09, 2010

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Listed below are links to weblogs that reference HHS Denies Request to Exercise Bayh-Dole "March-in" Rights for Fabrazyme:

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We have quite a bit on this dispute here: http://www.keionline.org/fabrazyme

James,

I'm sure we'll hear a "howl" from somewhere about NIH not granting "march-in-rights" Fabrazyme, perhaps Senator Sherrod Brown from Ohio who squawked about not granting such "march-in-rights" in the case of Norvir and Xalatan. But the NIH was absolutely correct to deny "march-in-rights" for Fabrazyme Even granting such rights wouldn't have helped here. If "march-in-rights" are ever granted other than in the most rare and egregious of circumstances, you can kiss the benefits of Bayh-Dole good bye.

"supply because it would simply take too much time for FDA approval."

In the mean time, if all of you going to die could just line up over here in a line we can put you in a big ol' grave a lot easier. Thank you for your cooperation.

" Even granting such rights wouldn't have helped here. "

Yeah they might also have to, oh I don't know, get off their arses and approve the thing or provide a waiver for any company willing to try to help these people?

The FDA: making sure you're healthy while you're dying.

In some situations -- particularly relating to the treatment of medical disorders -- I've long thought that compulsory licensing should be the standard. Not only might it help save lives, but it would likely do much to improve the image of patent law to IP opponents and the general public.
http://www.ipdigit.eu/?p=552

"In some situations -- particularly relating to the treatment of medical disorders -- I've long thought that compulsory licensing should be the standard. Not only might it help save lives, but it would likely do much to improve the image of patent law to IP opponents and the general public.
http://www.ipdigit.eu/?p=552
"

Don't forget helping to avoid the bankruptcy of our country.

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